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New Normal – Collaboration Tools – Trello

Trello – The playful and pretty way to manage a project

If you are a fan of using post-it notes to organize your projects, you will love this next tool!

This post is part of the “New Normal – Collaboration Tools” series, and we are going to look at Trello.

Trello is so simple that it can be explained with just the picture below:

The idea is to use cards, organized in lists, to keep track of what is going on in the project. And the most simple version is to have the three classic lists:

  • To do 
  • Working On In
  • Done 

As you have guessed, you choose a card from the “To Do” list and move it to “Working On It” and when you finish, you move the card to the “Done List.”

So why is this so powerful, and not just use sticky cards on a real board? 

This series is called “Collaboration” tools, so that is where the power is. The Trello boards can be shared with teams of people. Now everyone can see the lists and move the cards around. This way, you can easily coordinate. For example, two people cannot pick up the same card to start working on it. Everyone has a clear picture of the status of the project by looking at the board. 

And the goodies don’t stop here! 

Each card can have its own comments – keeping the discussion always linked to the correct context.

The cards can have checklists – those can be used in very creative ways. For example, you can fragment the work further in sub-tasks, you can have a list of prerequisites that you are waiting to be fulfilled, and so on.

And the cards also have attachments. Attachments allow you to link relevant files to the card so the team can easily find them and access them as needed.

You can assign the card to someone, and you can set a due date

The interface is very friendly, playful, and easy to grasp! But make no mistake, Trello is not a toy. If you have time to dig into it, you will discover that it is an amazingly powerful tool. 

How to choose between Trello and Asana? 

If you are just starting with project management online, go with Trello. The free tier will serve you well for a long time. Asana is more complex and not as easy to learn. The only reason I am using Asana over Trello is due to my own resistance to change :). 

New Normal – Collaboration Tools – Asana

As I wrote in a previous post, the remote collaboration will become the “new normal,” so you might as well get comfortable with the tools. 

I bring up again the resistance to change. Know it is there, say “hello” to it, and then persist anyway. There are gems and diamonds on the other side! (And cookies if you like sweets).

Bribing aside, you can find dozens of tutorials on how to use Asana, so let’s instead dive into this question: “why bother?”

The challenges of “self-management”

School, and the first jobs I had, taught me to be obedient and to follow orders. This habit meant that someone else had to do the planning, issue the requests, and track the progress. 

When I broke off, on my own, choosing my projects and collaborators did not mean that I instantly knew how to self manage! Quite the opposite!

I was anxious that nobody was telling me what to do and when to do it. I perceived this responsibility as a burden. (spoiler alert – it is, in fact, great freedom, but it took me a while to wake up to that).

I began by writing my thoughts and things to do on pieces of paper. That worked so well for the first few days until I realized I was losing the pieces of paper, or some of the messages were no longer making sense because they had no context. (I had on a piece of paper this note in big, bold letters: “Very Important: 5“. To this day, I don’t know what was so important about that five.)

Next, I moved my notes to the computer. Each project had a “TO-DO.txt” file where I would write my tasks, and log my progress. This file worked well for many years. And I still use it today for small projects. With larger projects, it was getting more and more difficult to scan the file to see what is “done” what “needs to be done” and what is the deadline for each item. 

And there was another problem. I was continually checking that I did not miss anything from what I promised I would do and that I would deliver on time. This monitoring would crowd my attention by keeping mental track of dates and features and promises. Not much room left for creative thinking. 

I looked for a solution. I knew from the start that it had to be online. Why? Because I did not want to carry my computer with me to check on things. Ideally, I would log into a website and have everything there, accessible from wherever I have an internet connection.

The right tool for the job

I tested a couple of things, and the tool I like the most was Asana.

First of all, it has a free tier that has everything that I need. 

Second, it has an excellent design that makes sense. Think of it as an advanced “TO DO” list manager. That means you can easily add items; you can check them off as done; you can immediately see what still needs your attention.

These reasons were great, but what sold it to me was the feature to add “comments” for each item. I did not even know that I was missing this feature. Comments became essential for complex tasks, where I had to do research and keep track of my findings and have all that information connected with the relevant “to-do item.” A long text file with notes would become so hart to read that it would be useless. But items with their own set of comments, now that is very easy to digest at any time. 

The second thing was the reminders! When you set a deadline for a specific item, you will be emailed a few days in advance that you need to take care of that item. Now, I could relax and free my memory from all the dates and deadlines and allow the software to do that for me, knowing that I will not miss anything. 

The final reason is why I put this into the “collaborative tools” section. You can add more people into a project, share your list of items, add comments, and complete tasks. You no longer have to write emails working out with collaborators what needs to be done. Instead, you can assign a task to someone with two clicks, and they will get notified about it. A follow up to the email problem is that you can keep all the discussion next to the task, so you don’t have to search for an old email.

For a team (and even a solo project), this tool adds clarity! I have discovered that when you are clear on what needs to be done, it is much easier to build the confidence and the motivation to actually do it. 

In Conclusion: choose a small project and give Asana a go. Don’t just read this post and decide, but actually test it out and then decide if this can improve your workflow by freeing your mind to focus on the creative things and not project tracking. Look at this as an investment in yourself and your team.

The Power of Using APIs

Many years ago, I had set up my very first website. It was a Sudoku generator based on a selected difficulty level.

To promote the website, I wanted to have a newsletter so I could email my subscribers a daily puzzle to print out.

At the time, I was using AWeber as my newsletter service.

I was very annoyed with the fact that to capture the email of my visitors I would have to send them to a new AWeber page where they would fill out a form, and then instruct them to go to their email to click the confirmation link, and that would get then to a confirmation page on AWeber, and then finally back to my website.

Those were way too many clicks to get yourself a printable sudoku puzzle!

What I wanted, was a way to plug into the AWeber service, and communicate with them, on my visitors’ behalf, while the visitors were staying on my website. What I wanted was an API, which is short for Application Programming Interface.

They did not offer that at the time, so I decided to simulate one by using a “fake browser” to make it “as if” the user has opened their page instead of my mine.

I was very proud of my solution, and it worked very well for about ten days until my account was banned for violation of terms of service.

Today they do offer an API, so I don’t have to resort to “shady tactics” to keep the users on my page.

I use this little story to make it evident why APIs are so powerful. I am all about automation and integration and the APIs make all this possible in a way that is reliable and makes sense and does not violate any agreements 🙂

I don’t think it makes sense to create an online service in today’s world and not to develop an API for it. Interconnectivity and interoperability increase the rate of adoption of your service. And you open it up to be used in ways that you may not even have imagined before and if you connect it, for example, to a platform like Zappier.

In conclusion, I feel that all software development is moving towards building APIs that will talk to each other. Even the front-end of websites will be a templating API making requests to a back end API.

This change will bring about dramatic shifts it what software developers do and will open the doors for non-developers to be even more expressive and sophisticated in their creations. Add AI to this mix, and we can only guess at the limits 🙂

The New Normal – Collaboration Tools – Google Docs

A new era of remote work and collaboration is upon us. And it is time to build a “new normal” as we have this excellent opportunity for a reset. 

I have mixed feelings about Google, but leaving that aside, for now, let us have a look at their Google Docs platforms and how to use it to collaborate with your team. 

My idea here is to share with you what is possible so you can make an informed decision if this is something you can use to support your project and your people. If you do like these features, there are plenty of YouTube tutorials on how to use them. 

As you go through this keep in mind the “sunk costs” of using old technology (MS Word… I am looking at you!):

– I am used to it, and it works just fine

– I don’t have time to learn something new

– This is too confusing…

Note that this is your brain resisting change. When you evaluate a new tool, honestly consider the question: “if I were a master as this would this help my project and my team?” and try to ignore the “I don’t want change” mind chatter. 

Back to business! 

To get the most out of this tool, you will need a Google Account. It’s free to get one – free as in you pay with your attention and your privacy. If that is fine with you, then let’s proceed. 

Top collaboration features:

1. Multiple Live Editors of the document

This is ideal when you work with your team over a Zoom or Skype call. It allows everyone to open the document on their device and start working on it. The changes will be visible to everyone nearly instantly. No more sharing of Word Documents around! 

Tip: it may be a good idea, for some projects, that each editor uses their own color, so you can know later on what you wrote and what others wrote. (This is just a simple solution to this the advanced way is “version control” explained last)

2. Make suggestions instead of edits!

This is based on (or similar to) the MS Word “Track Changes” feature. You need to change your editing mode to “Suggestions,” and now, all the changes you make will have your name attached to them, and they will be next to the old text (instead of overwriting the old text). This feature allows anyone to chime in when doing brainstorm and review. At the end, the author of the document can review all the suggestions and approve or reject them. This is such a powerful tool because you can instantly see on the side of the document if there are changes that you need to review, and you have the name of the person who suggested the change. On top of this, each change gets a comment section where you can ask for clarifications, or you can explain why your suggestion should be accepted. 

This is, by far, my favorite tool to use when working on a document that requires the team’s input.

3. Comments

This feature is similar to the previous one. But instead of editing the document in “Suggestions” mode, you select a piece of text and make a comment on it. 

This comment will create a discussion box around it. This feature is useful in some cases, but it lacks the quick “accept/reject change” buttons that a suggestion has. So any editing suggestion you make as a comment has to be manually typed into the document later. 

Comments are great to give feedback on the text regarding legibility or clarity because you are not suggesting a change, you just need the author to make some clarifications. 

4. Assigning Tasks

This tool does not replace a proper project management tool (like Asana or Trello) but, for small teams, it can work wonders! Using the comments or suggestion features, when the discussion box is open, you can notify someone (prefix their name with @), or you can assign that item to someone (prefix their name with +). 

The beauty of this is that they get an email notification, so they will know their input is required. And if you have assigned the item to someone, in their google drive view, next to the document name, they will see a number of pending issues that they need to resolve. 

I hope it is obvious how this can be used to keep track of what needs to be done in a small project, so you don’t have tasks being forgotten or now knowing who is supposed to work on them. 

5. Version History

This is the least used feature, but one of the most powerful. I am a big fan of backups. It allows me to move quickly and to make mistakes, knowing that I have a solid safety net. If I screw up, I can restore the old version, and everything is good again! 

For large documents and documents that need to go through many revisions, sometimes it is helpful to see a “history” of how the document grew, what was changed, why, and by whom. Google Docs allows you to do that out of the box because the document has in it a history of the changes. This is tracked automatically, you don’t need to do anything. 

You can, however, at some point, label one of the versions as, say, “Final Draft” or “Version 1 – Published” and later one “Version 1.1” and so on. These labels that you create make it easier for you and the team when you go back to look at the timeline to make sense of what are the important edit points. 

In software development, this tool is used a lot, and I know how powerful it is. If you are new to this “version control” thing, you may not see the power of it right away, but give it a go in a big project, and you’ll not regret it. You will no longer be afraid you make a mistake, or that someone in the team got in and accidentally destroyed the document with large copy/paste operation. You can always “go back in time,” to when things were in good shape! And when you are no longer concerned with making mistakes, you can allow your creativity to shine!

In conclusion 

I’ve stormed through these features. If there is one in particular that you like, look for YouTube tutorials about it and put it to good use! 

Go create something amazing!

Conversions versus Beauty

As a designer, or even as a client, you are thinking of starting a new project, and you need to begin your UI design. 

And you’re thinking: it has to be modern, it has to be beautiful, it has to be exciting, it has to evoke these feelings and then from the infinite number of possibilities you need to choose something that will be your design. 

This can be daunting, and it may not actually serve you. And I confess I had made this mistake in the past a lot! I would learn new fancy ways to do something, and then I would use it everywhere because, drum rolls, I knew how! That is an excellent way to learn and practice your craft, but it is a terrible way to think about design. 

When I began working in projects that had a real business behind them, it became evident that once the design was done, other questions would come to the fore:

– how many visitors do we have

– out of those, how many became leads (subscribers)?

– out of those, how many purchased a product? 

– and out of those, how many become huge fans or joined the mastermind groups? 

These questions have something in common. They are not about esthetics, they are about numbers, and specifically about conversion rates: how much of X turned into Y? 

Now I start all the projects with these questions before even considering the design!

Who is supposed to use this website, and what for? And once I have an answer, what kind of action do I want my audience to take when they interact with my site? How will I measure that? And how do I maximize that? 

The answers to these questions will limit my design choices. And that is a good thing because fewer choices increase the chance of making the “right choice!”. If you go too crazy with your design, users will not be able to relate to it. If you are the same, then why should a client choose you? You need to find the sweet spot! Something that the potential customers can relate to, but that is also customized to serve their needs. 

This means you will need to choose specific fonts, certain colors, and image themes that will be dictated by your target audience and not by what you think “is beautiful.” 

If you are a designer and you need to make a choice, ask yourself: will this bring me closer to my conversion goals or not (pretty comes second).

And if you are a client, be very careful when you ask for a change because your brother does not like the colors, or you don’t like green. If you build something to serve an audience, then their preferences matter over yours. 

Of course, every decision you make can be wrong. You can make informed assumptions about your audience, read the studies about how color influences people and how the font face can make you look serious or playful, but you can still be wrong and not meet the conversion rates you were aiming for. This does not mean you have failed, it means you need to adapt.

An excellent way to adapt is to use A/B testing. I am still studying this concept myself, and it looks like a powerful way to reach “DDD” which is Data-Driven Design, versus “Beauty Driven Design” (which is a polite way to say “Guess Driven Design”). 

My challenge with A/B testing so far is that you need to have a broad test audience to be able to safely conclude that one variant of the test is definitely better than the other and by how much. If you’re into statistics, you’ll love this, and you can do the math yourself! If you are not, choose your testing tool wisely to avoid running meaningless tests with results that are not actually relevant. 

A case study is the website PenguinMagic. When I first looked at it, my design eye judged it as ugly and imaged someone lost their money paying for that. But I have learned that this “ugly design” converts for the people it is addressed to. Believe it or not, this is a multi-million dollar business. They made the clear choice of conversions over beauty!

How about your web project? Do you have goals for it? Are they conversion goals or “being pretty” goals? 

And finally, if you can recommend a useful A/B testing resource, I’d love to read more about it. 

The Importance of the Value Conversation

All too often, when a person contacts you for a job, you’re eager to say yes and get started! 

I now know that this is backward. 

Instead of being eager to get started, the first step should be to determine if you and the potential new client are a good fit. 

They have money to spend, and you need the work, so you are a perfect match, right? Well, not so fast! 

Here is what is going to happen if you and your client are not a good fit:

– communication will not be clear

– because of communication issues, the scope of the project will not be clear

– because the scope will not be clear what you will deliver will be all over the place

– customer will not be happy, will ask for endless changes

– you realize that what you get paid does not even cover the costs to have this project delivered

– you will be resentful and being to doubt your career choice

Sounds familiar?

At the beginning of a transaction, the only power you have is to say “NO,” so don’t give that up with a quick “YES.” 

Instead, try to dissuade this person from working with you. This way, you get out all of the objections from the start. 

Why did they call you specifically? Why didn’t they go to our competitors? Do they realize that you are likely the most expensive option they have? 

These questions will uncover some fascinating information that you wish you knew before you started the project. 

If they are still talking to you, they clearly value your expertise over your competitors, and they understand that you will not do cheap work. If they are not talking to you anymore, realize you were not a good fit, and you were able to determine this in minutes instead of months.

Now it is time to determine what kind of value you can create for your customer. 

The vital thing to notice here that I said “determine value,” and not “solution.” We are not thinking of solutions yet. And for me, this was a big aha moment. 

Unless you know what is valuable for your potential client, you will end up creating stuff that is mediocre in their eyes, or “OK” at best.

Another distinction to be made here is to understand that sometimes you will be talking with someone who will spend not their money, but their bosses money. And in that case, the question if their mind is: “will my boss approve of this and like me more or not?

Ask a lot of questions, take notes, and reflect back to them what you understood they value about what they want to achieve. 

Example: creating a website is not a “value goal.” Asking more profound questions, you may learn they have a product they want to promote and eventually sell. And today, there are ways to get into that without having to have a website. The solution you will end up offering will be very different than what they asked before. And you only know this because you asked about value first and only then you thought of solutions. 

But there is another less obvious benefit for having the value conversation. You will take notes, and you will agree to deliver on the value points discussed. So when you ship your project, they will be delighted with the result, or you will have to show them how the solution meets all the agreed-upon value points. And even if they “don’t like it” for whatever reason, if it delivers the value you agreed on, then you kept your promise, and now it’s time for them to keep theirs.

And a trustworthy business or one that delights gets referrals. Everybody wins! 

Credit where credit is due: These ideas are a shameless steal from Blair Enns – Win With Pitching. I sincerely believe that the more businesses adopt the value discussion midset, we will all be better off. We will charge more for our services, but the client will be happy to pay because they get the value they were looking for, and now that is crystal clear to them. 

I am ending with a quote from Seth Godin: 

“Yes, you will pay more, but you’ll get more than you paid for.”

Using Visual Builders for your website

I used to hate visual builders!

They looked great on the demo page, but as soon as you would like to do something somewhat different and custom, you would end up fighting with all the constraints put in place.

Because of this issue, I would almost always design my pages from scratch in HTML code and CSS style. Oh, the power and flexibility!

In recent projects, I have been forced to use visual builders because the end client wanted to be able to update the design themselves later on. They insisted that it had to be easy, so I had to go the visual builder way.

What I have learned is that the builders have come a long way since I have first looked at them, and they offer great flexibility within the constraints of their design.

And the constraints are a good thing. It keeps your look consistent and makes it a breeze to create layouts for various screen sizes. That is always a big challenge when writing code from scratch without any design system in place that limits your choices but maximizes compatibility.

The Builder I like the most so far is the one that comes with DIVI, the WordPress theme. Once you get to know it, you can build exciting layouts pretty fast.

There is a problem I have with it, though. That is performance. And sometimes, the output code seems to be unnecessarily complicated, making the size of your page bigger than it needs to be.

So there is always a trade-off.

How do I choose between one or another?

For large projects, I prefer to create my custom template and design systems for the performance and flexibility benefits.

And for smaller projects, I will use DIVI or something similar to create the design faster and visually.

We go back to the saying: use the right tool for the job 🙂

Get to know your tools

I think we can agree that time is a non-renewable resource. You cannot make back lost time. 

So it would make sense to maximize doing what inspires you and minimize tasks that feel like chores. One way to do that is to delegate, but in today’s world, there is another option: automation and better tools. 

The availability of better tools is not always easy to see or even to put in practice, because there is an emotional cost of trying something new, of letting go of how things used to work. 

Children seem very comfortable living in this space of not knowing and being curious. Still, most adults find the same space very uncomfortable, maybe because we associate it with feelings of incompetence. 

But once you become aware of this, you can choose to ask yourself: “Is the way I’ve always done this, the best way forward? Or is time to change?”

Let’s take WordPress as an example. It is trendy for its ease of use. There is a plethora of themes and plugins that allow non-technical people to create beautiful and sophisticated websites. But this does not mean that you will install WordPress and a theme, and in 10 minutes, you will be an expert in building websites. Yes, it is easy to use, but a different kind of easy. It means you don’t have to learn to code or to think like a programmer or do deal with complicated network protocols and fallback mechanisms. But it still means you need to learn to play with your toys. Those cubes won’t stack themselves into something interesting. You have to play. 

It is surprising to me how many people install a “drag-and-drop” builder on their site and then just create a massive text block with some colors in it that makes no use of the power of the new builder. 

Here is how I think about a new tool:

1. I decide based on recommendations from others and what I can glean from their marketing if this is a tool that may help me speed things along.

2. Once I’ve made up my mind that I will use this tool, I want to get close to mastering it. The reason is that a tool you don’t know will not speed things along; it will slow you down. So yes, in the beginning, you will “waste time,” creating silly pages, breaking them, and maybe pulling your hair out, but give it a few tries, and a light bulb goes off in your head. You now understand how your tool works, and you begin constructing instead of stumbling around.

3. To speed up the road to mastery, I have a simple strategy. I do specific Google searches that will help with deep learning. Those searches are:

– “the best features of [your tool]” – get to know why this tool is powerful and how it can help you

– “[your tool] vs [some other tool]” – side by side comparison helps your brain organize and remember the information better. Especially if you know one of the tools. “Oh, this is like my old online store… but better in this specific way! Got it!

– “top ten mistakes when using [your tool]” – let’s be honest; if they are top 10 mistakes, it is likely I am going to make them. So, I try to make different mistakes and learn from the common ones. This approach is good with learning because understanding why common mistakes are common helps you understand how to think about using your tool correctly. We make most mistakes because we don’t use a tool in the way it was designed to be used. (You can fry an egg with a hammer, and it may taste delicious… but that will be a long and frustrating experience. Blaming the hammer for being broken won’t help). 

– “master [your tool]” – this is the last search I do, because what you find assumes you are a pro, and you’re ready to look into more advanced use cases.

This kind of research can take from one hour to a couple of days, but then you can build your pages with blazing fast accuracy, and if something gets broken, you know why and how to fix it. 

Tip: When doing these searches, you will stumble on new terminology. Don’t skip over it. Make sure you understand what they mean. It is a process of discovery that will uncover many gems that you did not even know you were looking for.

4. Subscribe to your tool’s newsletter – this is just to keep up to date with the development of it. There is a caveat here, too many emails to read will not do you good. If you don’t get fantastic value from their newsletter, drop it.

In the end, I challenge you to question “common wisdom and practices” and come up with something better:

– build for desktop first and fix it on mobile – instead of building for mobile and then add layout for the desktop

– we need meetings to move forward and sync up – instead of using an async tool like Slack to share updates, ideas, and track progress 

– I don’t have time to learn new things – instead of learning new things will save me time in the long run

– I am too old/tired/young for this – instead of I am curious about this

Go build something interesting!

Event-Based Programming

After you work long enough on software projects, it will become self-evident why complexity is your enemy. Pieces of code that are highly dependent on each other will result in a maintenance nightmare. You cannot change or upgrade anything without risking to break the different parts that are tightly connected to it. 

The solution I have found that works best is “Event-Based Programming.” I did not invent it; it has been around for a long time. I discovered that adopting this pattern has made maintenance much more straightforward. 

In a nutshell, your program is no longer a collection of functions that call each other in an ever-increasing web of complexity. Instead, you have components that talk to each other by raising or listening to events. 

This breakdown allows you to change each event generator or event listener individually, and as long as the event format does not change, you don’t risk a break down in communication. 

An event generator will say: “Hey, something interesting has happened, and here are the details.” And it does not care what happens with that announcement. It could be that nobody cares, or it could be that many will take action on that event. 

An event listener, on the other hand, does not care how an event was generated. As long as something interesting happens, it will act on it. 

This decoupling makes debugging super easy too! Because you can test components independently by merely looking at the kind of “chatter” they generate. 

If you’re reluctant to adopt “events” in your codebase, now it’s time to make the jump.

Working from Home – Choose to embrace it

I didn’t plan to write about current events, but maybe this will help. 

I have made the transition to work from home a long time ago. The fact that I decided to do that and was not forced to do it, I am sure helped, but here are some things that I have learned that I would like to share with you.

I am also going to assert that you care about your work, and you want to continue, instead of merely taking time off now that “nobody is watching.” 

Your working Space

You need to have your distraction-free working space. It helps you with the discipline of “going to your office” every day. 

Your working Mode

Now that you work from home, you may be tempted to binge-eat while you work, to stay in your PJs, browse the YouTube, and latest news. Don’t do that. It will mess up with your focus and with your ability to do something productive for the day. 

As time passes and you get more disciplined, your working mode may include PJs and peanuts, but don’t start with that. Continue to “dress for success.” All of this is more of a “mind game” than anything.

Do not overwhelm yourself

The home office is a big change. Most humans don’t generally like change. The outside world is also going crazy. Be honest with yourself. Your energy and your ability to focus is not the same as it was before this change. Don’t overcrowd your workday. You are only setting yourself up for disappointment and burnout. 

There are many ways to do time management, but that I would suggest for this time is “the promise for today.” This way, you promise to do one important thing that can be done in a day and you do it. Yes, I said “ONE” (not ten). But I also said “important.” Trust me, drip by drip, you will make steady progress instead of burnout after burnout. 

Take care of your body.

It’s common sense, but let’s make it common practice. Drink water, take some pauses to stretch and walk around, look in the distance to relax your eyes, or better yet close them for a few minutes. This time is not an excuse to get out of working mode and binge on distractions. 

There is a tech solution for almost everything.

I don’t know what your work involves, but there is likely an app, a service, a new way of using technology to help you work from home. From remote access to files, to voice over IP, to Zoom calls and screen sharing, find your tools that can help. It can be done. If you don’t know how to do it, ask for help. Asking for help does not make you an idiot; it makes you efficient. 

We are all in this together.

It can get lonely when you work from home. Setup video calls with your team, even if only for 5 minutes after lunch. Call a friend for a “one on one – how are you doing conversation.”

But most of all, be compassionate and patient. The person at the other end of the line, computer, phone, service is in the same situation as you. They also are going through a big change, they also have family members to worry about, they are also concerned about the unknown future. Humanity first, business second. 

Keep positive

I am a strong believer in keeping your immune system in high gear. Stress can affect it dramatically, so stay positive as best as you can. Take things one day at a time. Make room for humor and play in your work. And when you are done working, I invite you to help another. You may have skills that are needed, knowledge than can be shared, but also a smile, a warm hug, or a deep “I see you” connection can go a very long way. 

“Live long and prosper!”