Home » tools

Tag: tools

My every day list of tools

Following is the list of tools I use to make my life easier. 

As a caveat, I am mostly active in the online software environment, so this list is heavily skewed in that direction.

1. Total Commander – geeky tool for file management. Features a “side by side” layout, making it easy to know what the source and what is the destination for what you are doing. Unlike the “copy/paste” concept in Windows Explorer. It has other neat features like super quick preview and edit capabilities.

2. FileZilla – Free FTP client – pretty basic – but it works. 

3. Sublime – my go-to text editor. It has replaced NotePad++ because it has a more polished UI that is easier on the eyes. It has syntax highlight and a neat feature that shows you what has changed in the document, even if you don’t use a versioning system. 

4. Photoshop – for my photo editing and image creation on Social Media and sometimes for personal photographs. 

5. Voice Metter Banana – virtual sound mixer for Windows. It allows me to record a call, increase the volume of the people on the call, and mix in music when needed

6. GoldWave – a sound editor, used mostly to clear noise from audio, or for trimming. Sometimes I use Audacity – depending on what I am trying to do.

7. Grammarly – AI-powered spell checker to make sure my writing is not filled with typos and grammar issues.

8. Slack – manage project communications

9. Evernote – taking notes, research, learning, todo list. Its beauty is that it syncs on all of my devices, has tags, can search text into an image, and is fast!

10. Zoho Docs – alternative to Google Docs – online solution for spreadsheets and writing documents

11. Asana – for project management 

12. Putty – SSH client for windows. Used for server management.

13. rsync – backup utility for my websites – creates versioned backups fast.

14. PhpStorm – long time favorite Php IDE – I like everything from JetBrains. They’re the best when it comes to creating software developer tools 🙂

14. ManyCam – virtual camera for Zoom calls – used to add titles, color correct my image, add filters and looks as PRO as possible 

15. Cmder – console for Windows (replacement for cmd) – mainly because it supports colors, making debugging console applications much easier. It also uses much cleaner fonts. Not sure when Windows will get a decent default console app.

16. Fastmail – email provider that respects my privacy

17. ESET – internet security: antivirus, firewall, sandboxing, and all that jazz. I’ve been using this for ten years now, and I am a happy customer!

18. Duplicati – Windows space-efficient backup tool based on the Linux “duplicity” tool. It saved me one from a complete HDD failure. 

19. Dropbox – cloud storage and sharing among devices.

20. Git and GitHub – software versioning system.

21. Figma – wireframes, mockups, design.

22. Google Calendar – mostly for reminders and sometimes for planning ahead skill development. 

If you know better, faster, and more useful alternatives for these tools, let me know in the comments below. I am always looking to expand my arsenal! The categories I care about are productivity, software development, and design. 

New Normal – Collaboration Tools – Trello

Trello – The playful and pretty way to manage a project

If you are a fan of using post-it notes to organize your projects, you will love this next tool!

This post is part of the “New Normal – Collaboration Tools” series, and we are going to look at Trello.

Trello is so simple that it can be explained with just the picture below:

The idea is to use cards, organized in lists, to keep track of what is going on in the project. And the most simple version is to have the three classic lists:

  • To do 
  • Working On In
  • Done 

As you have guessed, you choose a card from the “To Do” list and move it to “Working On It” and when you finish, you move the card to the “Done List.”

So why is this so powerful, and not just use sticky cards on a real board? 

This series is called “Collaboration” tools, so that is where the power is. The Trello boards can be shared with teams of people. Now everyone can see the lists and move the cards around. This way, you can easily coordinate. For example, two people cannot pick up the same card to start working on it. Everyone has a clear picture of the status of the project by looking at the board. 

And the goodies don’t stop here! 

Each card can have its own comments – keeping the discussion always linked to the correct context.

The cards can have checklists – those can be used in very creative ways. For example, you can fragment the work further in sub-tasks, you can have a list of prerequisites that you are waiting to be fulfilled, and so on.

And the cards also have attachments. Attachments allow you to link relevant files to the card so the team can easily find them and access them as needed.

You can assign the card to someone, and you can set a due date

The interface is very friendly, playful, and easy to grasp! But make no mistake, Trello is not a toy. If you have time to dig into it, you will discover that it is an amazingly powerful tool. 

How to choose between Trello and Asana? 

If you are just starting with project management online, go with Trello. The free tier will serve you well for a long time. Asana is more complex and not as easy to learn. The only reason I am using Asana over Trello is due to my own resistance to change :). 

The New Normal – Collaboration Tools – Google Docs

A new era of remote work and collaboration is upon us. And it is time to build a “new normal” as we have this excellent opportunity for a reset. 

I have mixed feelings about Google, but leaving that aside, for now, let us have a look at their Google Docs platforms and how to use it to collaborate with your team. 

My idea here is to share with you what is possible so you can make an informed decision if this is something you can use to support your project and your people. If you do like these features, there are plenty of YouTube tutorials on how to use them. 

As you go through this keep in mind the “sunk costs” of using old technology (MS Word… I am looking at you!):

– I am used to it, and it works just fine

– I don’t have time to learn something new

– This is too confusing…

Note that this is your brain resisting change. When you evaluate a new tool, honestly consider the question: “if I were a master as this would this help my project and my team?” and try to ignore the “I don’t want change” mind chatter. 

Back to business! 

To get the most out of this tool, you will need a Google Account. It’s free to get one – free as in you pay with your attention and your privacy. If that is fine with you, then let’s proceed. 

Top collaboration features:

1. Multiple Live Editors of the document

This is ideal when you work with your team over a Zoom or Skype call. It allows everyone to open the document on their device and start working on it. The changes will be visible to everyone nearly instantly. No more sharing of Word Documents around! 

Tip: it may be a good idea, for some projects, that each editor uses their own color, so you can know later on what you wrote and what others wrote. (This is just a simple solution to this the advanced way is “version control” explained last)

2. Make suggestions instead of edits!

This is based on (or similar to) the MS Word “Track Changes” feature. You need to change your editing mode to “Suggestions,” and now, all the changes you make will have your name attached to them, and they will be next to the old text (instead of overwriting the old text). This feature allows anyone to chime in when doing brainstorm and review. At the end, the author of the document can review all the suggestions and approve or reject them. This is such a powerful tool because you can instantly see on the side of the document if there are changes that you need to review, and you have the name of the person who suggested the change. On top of this, each change gets a comment section where you can ask for clarifications, or you can explain why your suggestion should be accepted. 

This is, by far, my favorite tool to use when working on a document that requires the team’s input.

3. Comments

This feature is similar to the previous one. But instead of editing the document in “Suggestions” mode, you select a piece of text and make a comment on it. 

This comment will create a discussion box around it. This feature is useful in some cases, but it lacks the quick “accept/reject change” buttons that a suggestion has. So any editing suggestion you make as a comment has to be manually typed into the document later. 

Comments are great to give feedback on the text regarding legibility or clarity because you are not suggesting a change, you just need the author to make some clarifications. 

4. Assigning Tasks

This tool does not replace a proper project management tool (like Asana or Trello) but, for small teams, it can work wonders! Using the comments or suggestion features, when the discussion box is open, you can notify someone (prefix their name with @), or you can assign that item to someone (prefix their name with +). 

The beauty of this is that they get an email notification, so they will know their input is required. And if you have assigned the item to someone, in their google drive view, next to the document name, they will see a number of pending issues that they need to resolve. 

I hope it is obvious how this can be used to keep track of what needs to be done in a small project, so you don’t have tasks being forgotten or now knowing who is supposed to work on them. 

5. Version History

This is the least used feature, but one of the most powerful. I am a big fan of backups. It allows me to move quickly and to make mistakes, knowing that I have a solid safety net. If I screw up, I can restore the old version, and everything is good again! 

For large documents and documents that need to go through many revisions, sometimes it is helpful to see a “history” of how the document grew, what was changed, why, and by whom. Google Docs allows you to do that out of the box because the document has in it a history of the changes. This is tracked automatically, you don’t need to do anything. 

You can, however, at some point, label one of the versions as, say, “Final Draft” or “Version 1 – Published” and later one “Version 1.1” and so on. These labels that you create make it easier for you and the team when you go back to look at the timeline to make sense of what are the important edit points. 

In software development, this tool is used a lot, and I know how powerful it is. If you are new to this “version control” thing, you may not see the power of it right away, but give it a go in a big project, and you’ll not regret it. You will no longer be afraid you make a mistake, or that someone in the team got in and accidentally destroyed the document with large copy/paste operation. You can always “go back in time,” to when things were in good shape! And when you are no longer concerned with making mistakes, you can allow your creativity to shine!

In conclusion 

I’ve stormed through these features. If there is one in particular that you like, look for YouTube tutorials about it and put it to good use! 

Go create something amazing!